How Then Shall We Live?

Anonymous said: Hi I was wondering about the M.I.A picture you reblogged. I understand that Western Europeans switched the meaning, but isnt it still offensive to the families effected by the holocaust?

angrywocunited:

Tumblr user timsaturday left an informative comment on that post:

This isn’t a Nazi Swastika what so ever, as a JEW I can recognize this unlike some people.
Gonna quote straight from wikipedia here.

It is a symbol among the ancient Celts, Indians, and Greeks,[2]as well as in later Buddhism,[4]Jainism,[5]Hinduism,[6][4]and Nazism,[3][4]among other cultures and religions.[4][2]

The word swastika derives from the Sanskrit root ssu(“Good”),asti(“to be”),[4][6]andka(making)[6]The older term gammadion cross derives from its appearance, which is identical to four Greek gamma letters affixed to each other.

What I find interesting is that this is actually a very very good representation of what can happen when white people culturally appropriate something.

The Swastika, long before the Nazis came about and started brandishing their own bastardization of it, had a strong religious and cultural significance to a LOT of people.

It didn’t represent anything evil, it didn’t represent a dictatorship that perpetuated one of the most well known genocides taught today.

It only started having this horrible association in the 1920’s when the Nazi party appropriated it as for their logo.

White people, white supremacists, taking something with an already well established past and meaning; and placing their own over it.

Because of these people, swastikas that do not have anything to do with the Nazi party are demonized in most people’s eyes because they don’t know any better, because white people wiped out it’s original meaning in white culture.

People seriously need to learn some history.
THIS is the sort of damage that cultural appropriation can do in the long run.

onlyblackgirl:

talking to white people about racism

(Source: bryansbeard, via whitepeoplestealingculture)

wrapyourselfaroundmyfinger:

jonny-poopoo-pants:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

For The First Time Ever, All Four Eyewitness Accounts of The Murder of Michael Brown Put In Chronological OrderThe most detailed side-by-side telling of each eyewitness account of the Mike Brown murder in chronological order #JusticeForMichaelBrown [@ShaunKing]

Reblog the fuck out of this

BOOST^^^^^^^

(via notsocolourblind)

breenewsome:

Handcuff suicides are oddly common… #handsup #dontshoot #policebrutality #ourlivesmatter #ferguson #mikebrown #blacklivesmatter

breenewsome:

Handcuff suicides are oddly common… #handsup #dontshoot #policebrutality #ourlivesmatter #ferguson #mikebrown #blacklivesmatter

(via notsocolourblind)

dawnawakened:

Yasuhiro Onishi, Black Spirit. (c. 2010)

Recently they did a phenomenal set of twin peaks portraits :D

dawnawakened:

Yasuhiro Onishi, Black Spirit. (c. 2010)

Recently they did a phenomenal set of twin peaks portraits :D

(via thecutoutclub)

whitecolonialism:

Ferguson, MO.

"All my friends have been killed, I’m sick of it."
- Protestor Jamell Spann yells at Ferguson police officers.

whitecolonialism:

Ferguson, MO.

"All my friends have been killed, I’m sick of it."

- Protestor Jamell Spann yells at Ferguson police officers.

(via whitepeoplestealingculture)

halftheskymovement:

Gulabi Gang, Hindi for the “Pink Gang” have taken it upon themselves to to protect the poor and call out India’s most corrupt officials. What started out with a few dozen women in the Banda District of Uttar Pradesh in Northern India turned into a group of twenty thousand members by 2008. Amana Fontanella-Khan’s new book, ‘Pink Sari Revolution,’ delves into the astounding success of India’s gang of fearless women for justice.
Read an excerpt from the book at Women in the World.

halftheskymovement:

Gulabi Gang, Hindi for the “Pink Gang” have taken it upon themselves to to protect the poor and call out India’s most corrupt officials. What started out with a few dozen women in the Banda District of Uttar Pradesh in Northern India turned into a group of twenty thousand members by 2008. Amana Fontanella-Khan’s new book, ‘Pink Sari Revolution,’ delves into the astounding success of India’s gang of fearless women for justice.

Read an excerpt from the book at Women in the World.

(via angrywocunited)